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Pig basics (part two)

Cillside Farm, Glenridding, Penrith, Cumbria

New Theories

Mitchum's Campsites, Moor Lane, Croyde, Devon

Huntstile Organic Farm, Coathurst, nr Bridgwater, Somerset

Tea democratised (part four)

Hook Farm Caravan Park, Gore Lane, Uplyme, Lyme Regis, Dorset

Burnbake Campsite, Rempstone, Corfe Castle, Wareham, Dorset

White pigs (part one)

A Sacred Landscape

The Royal Oak, Hurdlow, nr Buxton, Derbyshire

Kitts Cottage Camp, Freshfield Place Farm, Sloop Lane, Scaynes Hill, West Sussex

Tea democratised (part two)

Tea democratised (part six)

George I and George II (1714 - 1760)

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Humble Bee Farm, Flixton, Scarborough, North Yorkshire

As you bounce along the bumpy farm track and Humble Bee Farm comes into view, it quickly becomes clear that this is going to be a special place to camp. Hidden away in a tranquil valley among the Yorkshire Wolds, the farm's surrounding fields are edged with the vibrant reds, blues, and yellows of bellflowers, harebells, and wild mignonette. These wild flowers have been planted to provide birdseed mix and are part of the farm's commitment to conserve wildlife and promote biodiversity; encouraging lapwings, corn buntings, skylarks, and even deer to visit the farm.
Park House Campsite, Keld, Swaledale, North Yorkshire

Park House is situated in the wild upper reaches of Swaledale, in the least-visited area of the Yorkshire Dales National Park, and in a place many folk consider to be the most unspoilt and emptiest chunk of scenery in northern England.
Swaledale Camping, Hoggarths Farm, Keld, Richmond, North Yorkshire

This site is delightful in its simplicity: a working farm that breeds pedigree Swaledale sheep in a particularly isolated area of the Yorkshire Dales.
Gibraltar Farm Campsite, Hollins Lane, Silverdale, Lancashire

Morecambe Bay is a classic sweeping stretch of coast with an extended shoreline incorporating towns from Fleetwood to Barrow-in-Furness, a road trip of about 70 miles. Both beautiful and dangerous, the landscape may look like the stuff of beach dreams on a hot sunny day, with its expansive golden sands and gleaming sea in the distance, but the erratic tidal patterns hold dangers.
Gordale Scar Campsite, Gordale Farm, Malham, North Yorkshire

Wordsworth penned sonnets about it. James Ward painted an enormous canvas of it (now in Tate Britain). And these days you can camp in it. Gordale Scar, that gaping wound on the skin of Yorkshire's landscape, was hewn 100 metres deep through the limestone rock by successive torrents of glacial meltwater.
Knight Stainforth Hall, Little Stainforth, Settle, North Yorkshire

Knight Stainforth is what you could call a 'comfy' site. It's been going for over eight decades, which gives an idea of both its popularity and its owners' ability to know a thing or two about how camping should be done. The route to the site - all grassy slopes dissected with stone walls and dotted with deserted stone barns - gets you in the mood for the rural experience to come. Many use the site as a jump-off point for the Pennine Way, Cycleway, and Bridleway, and the surrounding countryside is peppered with many a foss and force.
Wyreside Farm Park, Allotment Lane, St Michael's-on-Wyre, Garstang, Lancashire

Here at Wyreside, life bumbles along quiedy by the peaceful waters of the River Wyre in the middle of rural Lancashire, and initially nothing looks that radical. Then you notice that the hens wandering around are a bit hippy-looking, and discover that some lay blue eggs, others green (though they taste the same as the 'normal'-looking ones) and it dawns that this is no ordinary campsite.
Middle Beardshaw Head Farm, Burnley Road,Trawden, Colne, Lancashire


As you wend your way through the towns of East Lancashire in search of this site, you can't help but notice all the old cotton mills and their chimneys piercing the leaden skies of Burnley and Colne. These grim relics, with their dark, gaunt-looking stone walls, resemble decaying temples from a forgotten age; left to haunt the present with their forbidding presence.
Jerusalem Farm, Jerusalem Lane, Booth, Halifax, West Yorkshire

Camping is all about getting closer to nature, so what better place to camp than in a nature reserve? With walks aplenty nearby, Jerusalem Farm — nestled in the picturesque Luddenden Valley, near Halifax - couldn't be better placed. Luddenden is a steep and narrow valley, an almost-hidden gorge deep in the heart of Pennine Yorkshire. Luddenden Beck, long exploited by local mills for its fast-flowing waters, runs along the valley's base, and it is by the banks of this brook that you'll find Jerusalem Farm.
North Lees Campsite, Birley Lane, Hathersage, Derbyshire

An almost magical quietude emanates from North Lees, a somewhat idyllic Peak District National Park Authority campsite shielded within a grove of oak- and beech-lined woodland deep in the heart of Pride and Prejudice land. Set across a few gently sloping fields, the site-has its very own babbling brook and you can see England's largest cliff- Stanage Edge - peeking over the top of the distant treeline.