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Pig basics (part two)

Cillside Farm, Glenridding, Penrith, Cumbria

New Theories

Mitchum's Campsites, Moor Lane, Croyde, Devon

Huntstile Organic Farm, Coathurst, nr Bridgwater, Somerset

Tea democratised (part four)

Hook Farm Caravan Park, Gore Lane, Uplyme, Lyme Regis, Dorset

Burnbake Campsite, Rempstone, Corfe Castle, Wareham, Dorset

White pigs (part one)

A Sacred Landscape

The Royal Oak, Hurdlow, nr Buxton, Derbyshire

Kitts Cottage Camp, Freshfield Place Farm, Sloop Lane, Scaynes Hill, West Sussex

Tea democratised (part two)

Tea democratised (part six)

George I and George II (1714 - 1760)

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"K" for kiosk (part two)The Post Office intended to use the K2 almost exclusively in London and, as boxes in the first production batch cost over £50 each, it determined that other places would get them only in the most special circumstances. This policy was largely successful: of more than 1500 K2s, only a few dozen or so were installed on sites outside London.

The K2 was not only too expensive for general use, it was also too big. With these factors in mind, the Post Office decided to continue to supply the Kl, but in a dramatically remodelled form. Designated the Kl Mk236 and introduced in 1927, it had glazing reminiscent of Giles Gilbert Scott's design and was painted cream, with red glazing bars and a red door.
"K" for kiosk (part one)The concrete Kiosk No. 1, as introduced in 1921. It was made up in sections of rein¬forced concrete and fitted with a wooden door. The upper portion had glazed panels on the two sides and front. The three con¬crete sections fit into the base and top, all joints being filled in with cement. The first model, the Mk234, had wooden window frames. These were soon replaced by metal frames, in the Mk235.
The early yearsThis rustic-style box was in service near Blackburn. The photograph dates from 1907. Notice the coin-operated door lock. Coinboxes as we now know them were a later development.